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Corolla adds a touch of modern class to the classic Outer Banks vacation. Prized for both its seclusion and its abundance of upscale but funky shops and dining options, Corolla is the ideal vacation destination for families who are just as happy lounging on the beach in flip flops as they are indulging in an afternoon at the spa.

The small-town beach community combines all the best elements of a five star resort vacation, while still encompassing that laid-back Outer Banks style that embraces the beach life. With minimal development but lots of amenities, Corolla is perfect for those who want to get away from it all, but still enjoy all the best dining, shopping, water sports, and amenities that the Outer Banks has to offer.

Beachfront homes in Corolla

Where to stay in Corolla

Corolla is a unique destination that borders both the Atlantic Ocean and the Currituck Sound, allowing visitors to access to the salty ocean waves, the calm kayak-worthy sound waters, and the idyllic maritime forests that lie in between. The outskirts of the village are dominated by an assortment of rental home communities, with vacation homes ranging from the modest 3 bedroom beach cottages to luxury oceanfront vacation homes with private pools and unlimited amenities.

Most vacationers book a vacation rental home, which is rented in 1 week increments, and can vary from 2-18 bedrooms. Due to the growing upscale reputation of the area, many of these homes offer a variety of luxury amenities such as private heated pools, hot tubs, game rooms, plush theater rooms, internet access, and easy beach access. A number of reputable vacation rental management companies service the area, so there is generally a wide selection to choose from. The grandiose nature of these vacation homes make them ideal for special events as well, such as Outer Banks weddings, or corporate retreats. The following are companies offering vacation rentals in Corolla.

Vacation Rental Companies

Historic Corolla Park from the top of Currituck Beach Lighthouse

Corolla Attractions

Corolla's wild Horses - Roaming the Northern beaches of Corolla and Carova, this herd of Wild Colonial Spanish Mustangs is perhaps more popular than the Currituck Beach Lighthouse or Whalehead in Historic Corolla. Visitors can find the horses along the beach and within the community of Carova. A 4x4 vehicle is required to access this rather remote area. Guided tours are available in specialized vehicles.

Corolla's Wild Spanish Mustangs

The Corolla Wild Horses have been a draw to vacationers for decades, as their mystique and centuries old legacy is simply unmatched on the local OBX coastline. Added to this is the romantic idea of a beach vacation that's truly wild, with mustangs who travel up and down the Carova beaches with ease and absolute abandon. It's no wonder that popular fiction and movies, such as the recent release of "Nights In Rodanthe" has romanticized their presence, and why so many vacationers fall in love with the wild horses and make a visit to the Corolla Wild Horse Fund every year to find out how they can help.

It is important to remember that the Wild Colonial Spanish Mustangs are, infact, wild. Do not approach within 50 feet of the horses, or feed them. Wild horses cannot digest fruits and vegetables like domesticated breeds. Close interaction is dangerous to both humans and horses.

Whalehead in Historic Corolla - Completed in 1925, the sprawling lemon yellow Whalehead in Historic Corolla has served a number of purposes during its decades of operation, including housing a private school for boys and acting as a rocket fuel-testing base. Today, the Whalehead in Historic Corolla is one of Corolla's best attractions, offering seasonal guided tours, 39 acres of picturesque landscape for picnic baskets, and special facilities for weddings and special events. Seasonally, you'll find a number of the area's best events on the premises, like the weekly Wednesday wine festival, where visitors are encouraged to sample North Carolina's best wines and local foods while listening to a little live outdoor music.

Currituck Beach Light at dusk

Currituck Beach Lighthouse: Vacationers with stamina are welcome to trek up the 214 steps to the top of the Currituck Beach Lighthouse for unparalleled 360 degree views of the Outer Banks. The historic and distinctive red lighthouse is open seasonally to visitors from 9a.m. to 5p.m., and the wooded grounds, which include the original light keepers home, is idyllic for a bike ride or a stroll through the live oaks. As one of the last testaments to Corolla's early roots as a local seaside community and guardian for sailors travelling past the Outer Banks, the lighthouse is a must on every visitor's list.

Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education

Center for Wildlife Education - Located i Historic Corolla Park, the center is an impressive and marvelous 22,000 square foot interpretive center for young and old alike to explore the history and vast diversity of North Carolina's wildlife. One of the key displays is a massive living aquatic ephemera of fish, native to the region, housed in an 8,000 gallon aquarium where families can get up close and personal with a rich variety of finned swimmers. "You have to remember we have a variety of marine eco-systems here. The ocean, the sound and an estuary so it is pretty diverse.

Sunset at Currituck heritage Park

Watersports and Outdoor Activities - For those who crave a little more outdoor excitement, there are a number of water sport rental and instruction companies that cater to Corolla. Specialty shops offer rentals and lessons for corolla-surfing, ocean kayaking, SUP (stand up paddle boarding), and kiteboarding for vacationers who want an adventure on the water. For a relaxing outdoor excursion, take in a guided kayak tour of the Currituck Sound for a lazy sunset and an evening surrounded by egrets and Blue Herons.

Shopping - The heart of Corolla is a mini shoppers' paradise with a small number of shopping complexes, such as The Shoppes at the Currituck Club, TimBuck II, Monteray Plaza and Corolla Light Town Center, which offer both chic boutiques for souvenirs, and national chain grocery or staple stores for necessities. There are a couple hotels in the area for short stays, but most of the accommodations in Corolla are vacation rental homes which generally rent on a weekly basis, and are scattered throughout the area. Essentially, Corolla vacationers have the option to stay close to the shopping, dining, and activities of Corolla, or relax on the outskirts of the more developed center, in relative privacy.

Dining - After dark, there's a wide variety of restaurants to take in a quick North Carolina BBQ platter, have a pizza delivered to your vacation rental home, or enjoy a five course waterfront meal. Entertainment from karaoke to local bands is seasonably available, and provides an outlet for Corolla night owls.

Golf and Amusements - Out of the water, Corolla offers an 18-hole golf course, a skate park, putt-putt courses, and soundside nature trails to keep vacationers entertained.

The Beach - Like all Outer Banks vacation destinations, the beach is the main attraction, and with miles of unspoiled beaches without the development of commercial boardwalks, businesses, or 4WD traffic, Corolla is ideal for families who want a large patch of sand to play on. Still a relatively small vacation destination, vacationers will have no problem finding a spot to put their beach blanket, and the seclusion of Corolla is one of its many draws as a beach vacation hotspot. Here are some things to know about Duck beach policies:

  • Dogs are allowed on Currituck County beaches all year. They must remain on a leash. There is no leash length requirement.
  • Fireworks and beach bonfires are not permitted in Corolla.
  • Beer is allowed on the beach. Wine and liquor are not officially permitted. Please drink responsibly.
  • Metal detecting is allowed.
  • Red flags = no swimming. When you see red flags flying, dangerous conditions are present and swimming is prohibited.
  • It is illegal to walk on the dunes, and it is also illegal to pick live sea oats growing on the beaches.
  • Fill in any holes you dig. Holes in the sand can be a hazard.
  • Be mindful of Noise. Most communities consider a violation of the noise ordinance to be any sound that can be heard from inside a nearby residence, and any load noise after approximately 11:00 p.m.
  • No glass on the beach. Be mindful of glass bottles. Alcohol is allowed on all beaches, but if at all possible, stick to cans and plastic to save future beach-goers from any bare foot injuries.
  • Surf fishing is allowed. A fishing license is required in North Carolina and can be obtained before your vacation via the NC Marine Fisheries and Wildlife website, or a fishing license can be purchased at most any tackle shop on the Outer Banks.
  • 4x4 vehicles can access the beach at the Northern end of NC 12 where the paved road ends. 4x4 access North of this point is permitted year round. 4x4 access South of this point is permitted between October 1 and April 30. Driving at night is allowed. Overnight parking is allowed if the occupant is actively fishing. ATV's allowed for residents with permit.

 

Corolla Events

Under the Oaks Art Festival - Late June each year in Historic Corolla Park, this outdoor art show offers over 100 quality artists , food, an art auction and children's activities. Admission is free, but a modest parking donation is requested to benefit the Whalehead Preservation Trust.

Festival of Fireworks - July 3 at Historic Corolla Park, this evening event offers live music, food vendors, family fun activities, cornhole, and games. And of course, a fireworks display at dusk. Free admission and parking.

Outer Banks Music Festival - Late May each year at The Whalehead in Historic Corolla, this festival offers a day of live music and performances. An admission fee applies. Beer and wine are available on site, but picnics and coolers are also welcome.

Mustang Music Festival - Early October each year, come see several bands perform live for the benefit of Corolla's Wild Colonial Spanish Mustangs. Childrens activities and vendors will attend. Tickets required.

A footbridge over an inlet at Historic Corolla Park

Some Corolla History

Corolla wasn't always the vacation hotspot it is today. The village was discovered, along with its neighbors Duck, Carova, and the Currituck mainland, in the late 1600s by a handful or European settlers, who stayed on the island to carve out a community by the sea. Corolla became official town name when the local post office took root in the late 1800s. For several centuries, Corolla remained an undisturbed home to a few hardy locals, and in the late 1800s, the population grew slightly as lifesaving stations, like the Jones Hill Life Saving Station, were constructed to help sailors navigate the oftentimes treacherous waters off the North Carolina coast. In 1873, construction began on the distinctive red brick Currituck lighthouse. Completed and in operation just two years later, the lighthouse literally served as a beacon to countless sailors cruising the dangerous northern stretch of Diamond Shoals.

An elevated walking path in Currituck Banks  Estuarine Reserve

A few decades after the Currituck lighthouse was constructed, Corolla received a minor population boost in the form of two of Philadelphia's wealthiest residents, Edward and Marie Louise Knight. In 1922, the couple began work on their luxurious seaside home, known today as the "Whalehead in Historic Corolla," and invited and hosted their friends on local hunting and fishing exhibitions. Despite the popularity within the Knight's inner circle, Corolla was still relatively unknown for the next 50 years, frequented only by daring vacationers who were willing to drive miles past the more popular areas of Nags Head, Kill Devil Hills and Kitty Hawk down clay and sand trails that were unpredictable and barely functional as roads.

In fact, there wasn't a legitimate road to Corolla until 1984 when NC Highway 12 was finally extended to the village, and development finally began to boom. The growth was slow at first, with a handful of communities like Ocean Sands and Whalehead popping up along the beaches, but by the late 80s, more and more developers had discovered the area. Over the next three decades, construction in Corolla surged, and the town became home to several hotels, resorts, grocery stores, restaurants, and shopping centers. Yet despite the developing interest, and thanks to a vocal local community, Corolla was able to maintain its status as a small town beach community, without the grander development of other North Carolina beach towns.

Wedding venue at Historic Corolla Park

 

What to know before you go to Corolla

Because Corolla accommodations are both limited and popular, it's important to book your stay well in advance. Search local vacation rental companies early to ensure the best selection. Traffic on the two-lane NC Highway 12 can be busy on summer weekends, so be prepared for minor delays when traveling, The reward is a vacation stocked with gorgeous beach days and plenty to do off the sand. Restaurant reservations are generally not be required, but might be recommended a few days in advance during the summer months.

With grocery and beach supply stores within a couple miles, it is not necessary to pack a lot of extras, and concierge services are available to have your beach necessities waiting for you when you arrive. Be sure and ask your rental company about guidelines for special vehicles, such as RVs and campers, as these may not be allowed in your beach community. Above all else, for vacationers on a budget, don't discount the off-season - the temperate beaches of North Carolina in the Fall and Spring shoulder seasons offer lots of secluded beaches, plenty of local attractions, and lots of open businesses at a better rate.

Corolla may have gained national attention as one of America's best secluded beaches with upscale amenities and luxurious accommodations, but thankfully, Corolla still retains its small beach-town charm that attracted Outer Banks visitors in the first place. For vacationing families who want plenty of sand to spread out, but would like to still enjoy the amenities of a resort beach community, Corolla is an ideal vacation destination.

Corolla Photos

Sunset view from the Whalehead in Historic Corolla in Corolla NC A new rental home neighborhood with 10+ bedroom homes in Corolla A bike path winds along NC 12 in Corolla NC An interior view of the beautiful Currituck Beach Lighthouse  The lightkeeper's house at Currituck Beach Lighthouse  4x4 Beach access at the North end of NC 12 in Corolla NC   Sunset over Currituck Sound    Corolla view from Currituck Beach Light Large homes in Corolla Fantastic biking/walking path along NC-12 in Corolla  

Resort Realty

Resort Realty

Since 1987, Resort Realty has been offering premier Outer Banks vacation rentals from Corolla to Nags Head. New for 2014, Resort Realty is now on Hatteras Island! As a leading Outer Banks property manager, our goal is to deliver the best possible customer service to all of our vacation rental guests and vacation homeowners. Our new website makes booking an OBX family vacation online easy and enjoyable. You can search by Outer Banks town, number of bedrooms, location to the beach, amenities and more. We invite you to return to our OBX vacation website after you are booked and discover local Outer Banks events, view OBX restaurants and begin planning your much anticipated Outer Banks family vacation.

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Bodie Island

Bodie Island

Bodie Island tends to cause a lot of confusion, for both the pronunciation of its name as well as its precise location. This small strip of the Outer Banks doesn't get a lot of attention, and most North Carolina visitors simply pass through the area on their way to or from the Hatteras and Ocracoke Island resort towns, or make a quick stop for an up-close-and-personal view of the Bodie Island Lighthouse.

Coastal Kayak Touring Company

Coastal Kayak Touring Company

If you are looking for adventure, stop by or call Coastal Kayak Touring Company and book your reservation. The company has been offering kayak and paddle boarding tours on the Outer Banks since 1999 and is located at the Waterfront Shops in Duck. Whether you choose to tour the Pine Island Audubon Sanctuary, Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge, the Kitty Hawk Woods Coastal Reserve or Alligator River, you are bound to have a wilderness experience like none other. Kayak tours are perfect for all ages and experience levels.

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, with its black and white candy-cane stripes, is one of the most famous and recognizable lighthouses in the world. Protecting one of the most treacherous stretches of the Outer Banks, with a beam of light that spans 20 miles into the ocean, the lighthouse is also the world's tallest brick lighthouse at a staggering 208' ft. tall.

OBX Biplanes

OBX Biplanes

OBX Biplanes offers open cockpit air tours of the Outer Banks and boasts one of the area's "most exciting things to do." The company describes the biplane tour as like a trip back in time - much like an “Out of Africa” flying experience of feeling “the wind in your hair, the sun on your face and joy in your heart."

Hatteras - Ocracoke Ferry

Hatteras - Ocracoke Ferry

The Hatteras / Ocracoke ferry is one of the most popular of the seven coastal ferry routes that are orchestrated and managed by the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT.) Open for everyone, with daily runs that occur 365 days a year, the short 40-45 minute island-hopping ferry provides an integral link for Ocracoke Island to the rest of the Outer Banks, and provides visitors of all seasons with an exciting way to enjoy a coastal day trip. For a little bit of completely free entertainment, hop aboard via car, truck, bike or even just on foot, and discover a scenic boat ride that's just as thrilling as discovering the island of Ocracoke itself.

Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates

Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates

Since 1968, our family owned and operated company has offered families just like yours a wide selection of Outer Banks vacation rentals in beach communities and towns of Duck, Southern Shores, Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head and South Nags Head. We invite you to view our brilliant photos, detailed property descriptions complete with amenity lists and maps. Make the selection that best suits your needs, and you will see why our guests consider us a part of their family.

 

Whalehead in Historic Corolla

Whalehead in Historic Corolla

The prestigious Whalehead in Historic Corolla has been a dominant attraction to Corolla visitors since it was renovated and opened to the public in 2002. As part of the Historic Corolla Park, the Whalehead in Historic Corolla serves as a northern Outer Banks icon, and a living testament to Corolla and Duck's heyday as a secluded oceanfront retreat for the country's wealthy hunters and conservationists.

Just for the Beach Rentals

Just for the Beach Rentals

Just for the Beach Rentals (not to be confused with the similarly-named "Just for the Beach") offers rentals to accommodate your stay. Equipment includes linens, baby gates, cribs, monitors, seats, joggers, bikes, kayaks, skim boards, surf boards, and SUP. Free delivery is available with a modest rental order, from Corolla to Nags Head (not including 4x4 areas). Just for the Beach offers two convenient locations in Corolla and Kill Devil Hills.

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Bodie Island Lighthouse

Bodie Island Lighthouse

The Bodie Island Lighthouse, (pronounced "Body") is located just south of the town of Nags Head and Whalebone Junction, where Highway 158, Highway 64, and NC Highway 12 intersect. Visitors travelling towards Hatteras Island can't help but notice the black and white horizontal striped structure, peaking out over a line of dense cedar trees on the soundside.

Buddhalicious

Buddhalicious

BuddhaLicious takes patrons on a glorious culinary trip through Asia without having to leave our beautiful Outer Banks. Corolla’s newest restaurant offers dishes from throughout South East Asia, using contemporary techniques with fresh and authentic ingredients.

Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse

Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse

The Roanoke Marshes lighthouse is often one of the most overlooked of the Outer Banks lighthouses, simply because of its small stature, limited visibility and remote location tucked away at the quiet east end of the Manteo waterfront.

Salt Water Grille

Salt Water Grille

We are Salt Water Grill and we proudly offer fresh made contemporary coastal favorites utilizing locally sourced seafood and produce, all natural pork, beef and chicken. We feature an excellent craft beer selection and a well rounded wine list to compliment our passion to provide consistently high quality real food for real people.

Fishing in the Outer Banks

Fishing in the Outer Banks

Long before the summer vacationing families discovered the Outer Banks as a hot tourist destination, fishermen from across the country flocked to coastal North Carolina. With no roads to navigate, and no vacation homes to stay in, anglers would brave the makeshift sandy paths that ran along thebeaches, and would set up makeshift campsites whenever there was protection from the wind and waves. They went through great efforts to visit the Outer Banks for one reason: Exceptional fishing.