Guideline Sections:

The Outer Banks has its fair share of attractions for vacationers, including the Wright Brothers Memorial, 4 famous North Carolina lighthouses, the NC Aquarium, the Lost Colony, and enough shopping and dining to keep any family entertained for a week-long vacation. But the biggest attraction that draws seasoned Outer Banks vacationers back every year are the miles and miles of pristine beaches.

Wild Spanish Mustangs on the beach in Carova

Unpopulated, unspoiled, and always open, the Outer Banks beaches have popped up on a number of National "Best Beaches" lists, including Coastal Living Magazine's list, and world renowned beach expert "Dr. Beach's" annual round-up of best American beaches.

So when planning your next Outer Banks vacation, be sure and reserve your largest blocks of time for beaching. With endless ocean views and large patches of sand just waiting for vacationers to stretch out, you'll quickly discover why the beach is the Outer Banks' best and most treasured attraction.

Outer Banks Beaches General Guidelines

  • Across all Outer Banks beaches, remember these important "rules of the beach".
  • Red flags = no swimming. When you see red flags flying, dangerous conditions are present and swimming is prohibited.
  • No Swimming or surfing within 300 feet of a fishing pier. It is dangerous and police can write citations to offenders.
  • Don't Swim alone. We recommend swimming at a beach that offers lifeguard service.
  • Learn about rip currents. Don't panic! Teach kids what to do if caught in a rip current.
  • Watch out for fishing lines. Surf fishing is popular in the Outer Banks.
  • Stay off the dunes. Keep off the dunes and stay on designated pathways to and from the beach to maintain the dunes' structural integrity. It is illegal to walk over dunes in many locations, and it is also illegal to pick live sea oats growing on the beaches.
  • Fill in any holes you dig. Holes in the sand can be a hazard. Digging large holes or mounding sand is illegal in some towns.
  • Don't feed the wildlife. Feeding or interfereing with wildlife is dangerous to humans and animals.
  • Be mindful of Noise. Most communities consider a violation of the noise ordinance to be any sound that can be heard from inside a nearby residence, and any load noise after approximately 11:00 p.m.
  • Pick up your trash. Be sure and pick up any trash that's left behind. Littering is illegal on all Outer Banks beaches. Most beach communities have trash receptacles right on the beach, or nearby on the beach access walkways and public parking areas.
  • No glass on the beach. Be mindful of glass bottles. Alcohol is allowed on all beaches, but if at all possible, stick to cans and plastic to save future beach-goers from any bare foot injuries.
  • No nudity. There are no nude beaches on the Outer Banks.
  • Camping is not allowed on any Outer Banks beaches except in designated campgrounds. There are a couple Oceanside (behind the dune line) campgrounds maintained by the National Park Service (NPS): One in Frisco near the Frisco Air Strip and one on Ocracoke Island. Please visit their website for camping information or call for reservations.
  • Pets are allowed on most all Outer Banks beaches, provided they are on a leash. As a courtesy, please pick up after your pet.
  • All beaches are open to the public. While there may not be public parking or ramps available, anyone can go to any beach on the Outer Banks.
  • Take your equipment with you. While it is not generally illegal in most Outer Banks communities to leave up canopies and umbrellas overnight, please refrain from doing so out of courtesy to your beach neighbors, as well as to protect your beach equipment from theft or wind damage.
  • Surf fishing is allowed on all Outer Banks beaches, with the exception of occasional seasonal closures by the NPS on Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands. You can visit the NPS website for current maps of beaches that are open to both pedestrians and vehicles. A fishing license is required in North Carolina and can be obtained before your vacation via the NC Marine Fisheries and Wildlife website, or a fishing license can be purchased at most any tackle shop on the Outer Banks.
  • New Nags Head canopies and tents rules: Leaving equipment on the beach unattended from 8 pm-7 am each day is prohibited. Canopies and tents must be placed no closer than 10 feet apart. Tents and canopies cannot be larger than 12x12 and stand no higher than 9 feet above the sand when erected. Beach equipment cannot obstruct the line of sight of a lifeguard to the sand and cannot obstruct the passage of public works or emergency vehicles.

 

4x4 beach in Hatteras, part of Cape Hatteras National Seashore

 

Beach Driving

Driving on the beach is a favorite Outer Banks activity. During the Summer, there are two main areas that allow driving on the beach. The first is Corolla and Carova, where route 12 ends and 4x4 access begins (headed North to the Virginia state line). The other area is Cape Hatteras National Seashore, which has many access points from Nags Head, South to Ocracoke Island. A permit is required to access National Park beaches by 4x4. Below are some general rules and regulations to follow during your off-road adventure.

General Beach Driving Rules

  • 4x4 access and beaches often refer to the acronym "ORV", which stands for "Off Road Vehicle".
  • Unless otherwise marked, speed limits are 25mph and 15mph or slower near others/pets/wild animals.
  • Watch for fishing lines and children playing.
  • Stay at least 50 feet away from wild horses.
  • Never drive on dunes or vegetation.
  • Obey all posted signs.
  • Park perpendicular to the water in the middle of the beach.
  • Traffic flows near the shoreline and dunes, with parked cars sitting between.
  • Tow straps, shovel, spare tire, jack and jack board are recommended, and sometimes required to be in the vehicle.
  • Open containers of alcohol are prohibited in vehicles
  • Drivers need to have a current, valid driver's license
  • Avoid driving or parking on the wrack line. The wrack line is a line of accumulated natural debris left by a previous high tide. Wrack lines are an important food source for birds.
  • Pedestrians always have right-of-way on the beach

Town-Specific Beach Driving Rules and Permit Information

  • Corolla - 4x4 vehicles can access the beach at the Northern end of NC 12 where the paved road ends. 4x4 access North of this point is permitted year round. 4x4 access South of this point is permitted between October 1 and April 30. Driving at night is allowed. Overnight parking is allowed if the occupant is actively fishing. ATV's allowed for residents with permit.
  • Duck - No public 4x4 access. Private access allows vehicles vehicles on the beach between October 1 - April 30.
  • Southern Shores - Driving on the beach is prohibited.
  • Kitty Hawk - Driving on the beach is prohibited.
  • Kill Devil Hills - Driving on the beach is permitted October 1 - April 30 through designated access points. Vehicles must have current safety inspection, registration, insurance and license plate. Obtain a beach driving permit either from the Town of Kill Devil Hills or the Town of Nags Head. Through a reciprocal program, each town recognizes the beach driving permit issued by the other.
  • Nags Head - Driving on the beach is permitted October 1 - April 30. Obtain a beach driving permit either from the Town of Kill Devil Hills or the Town of Nags Head. Through a reciprocal program, each town recognizes the beach driving permit issued by the other.
  • Rodanthe, Waves, Salvo, Avon, Buxton, Frisco, Hatteras, and Ocracoke - The beaches of Hatteras Island and Ocracoke Island are managed by the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Permits are required, and can be purchased online and sent via mail, or in person at one of the following locations: Coquina Beach office, Cape Hatteras Light Station, and the Ocracoke Visitor Center. Each vehicle must have its own permit. Vehicles must be registered, licensed, insured, and have a current safety inspection if required in home state/country. Vehicles must have low-pressure tire gauge, shovel, jack and jack support board. A spare tire, first-aid kit, fire extinguisher, trash bags, flashlight and tow straps are recommended. ATV's are not permitted. Night driving is generally allowed from November 16 through April 30. See current access ramps and beach closings by visiting this page and clicking on the "daily beach access map". Obey all posted signs.

Tips for Driving on the Beach

  • We recommend lowering tire pressure to between 20-25PSI, possibly lower in deep, soft sand.
  • It's usually best to follow previously-made ruts, as the sand is already packed.
  • Park above the high tide line
  • If tires spin, try decreasing tire pressure or digging sand out from around the tires.

Angus on the beach

Pets on the Beach

Thousands of Outer Banks visitors bring their furry family members in tow year after year. Dogs are allowed on most beaches, with some restrictions. Please note that owners must collect all pet waste immediately and dispose of it properly.

  • Carova and Corolla - Dogs are allowed on Currituck County beaches all year. They must remain on a leash. There is no leash length requirement.
  • Duck - Dogs are allowed on the beach year-round, unleashed. Owners must keep their dogs under control at all times.
  • Southern Shores - Between May 15 and September 15, dogs are allowed on the beach before 9am and after 6pm. Between September 16 and May 14, dogs are allowed on the beach all day. All dogs must be on a 10ft or less leash.
  • Kitty Hawk - Dogs are allowed on the beach year-round. From the Friday before Memorial Day until the day after Labor Day, they must be on a (maximum) 6ft leash between 10am and 6pm. All other times of the year, dogs must be on a (maximum) 12ft leash. Dogs may be taken off the leash during the off-season only if they are controlled by their owners and do not disturb others. Owners must be within 30feet of an unleashed dog, and have a leash with them at all times.
  • Kill Devil Hills - Dogs are not permitted on the beach between May 15 and September 15, from 9am to 6pm unless they are a service animal. Dogs are otherwise permitted on the beach, controlled by a handler with a leash.
  • Nags Head - Dogs are allowed on the beach year-round. They must remain on a leash 10ft or shorter.
  • Rodanthe, Waves, Salvo, Avon, Buxton, Frisco, Hatteras, and Ocracoke - Pets are allowed on a leash no longer than 6ft, year-round. Pets are prohibited on designated swimming beaches. Service animals are allowed at all times.

Beach Bonfire

Bonfires on the Beach

Fireworks

  • Fireworks are not permitted in the Outer Banks.

Alcohol on the Beach

  • Beer is allowed on Outer Banks beaches.
  • Glass containers are not allowed.
  • Open containers in vehicles are not allowed.
  • Wine and liquor are not officially allowed on the beach.
  • Use common sense and you'll likely be just fine.
  • Don't drink and drive.

Metal Detectors in the Outer Banks

Wild Horse Adventure Tours
Corolla Classic Vacations
Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education
Corolla Wild Horse Fund
Sun Fish Grill

Sun Fish Grill

Sun Fish Grill is a great stop for fresh local seafood and a variety of delicious specialties. The menu has a good balance whether desiring sea fare, vegetarian choices, chicken or steak for lunch and dinner. You can make up a meal with appetizers, soups and salads or order wraps, rolls, burgers, baskets, plates and platters. Enjoy traditional mussels with a wine and garlic sauce, crab bites, Ahi tuna and wings for starters. Dive into Lobster Bisque, award-winning New England Clam Chowder and a variety of salads including the Summer Fruit and Veggie salad that features mangos, blueberries, strawberries, asparagus, zucchini, yellow squash and baby spinach topped with avocados. Wraps and rolls include lobster, crab, tuna, chicken and veggie choices. Choose from chef specialties: fresh tuna, New York Strip, pasta dishes, Chicken Florentine, classic crabcakes and our signature nachos. Our Fisherman’s Platter, a house specialty includes fresh fish of the day, shrimp, oysters, and scallops. 

 

For most people, a vacation is a chance to unwind and escape from a day to day. However, some find inspiration and prospective business opportunities during their travels.

 

That’s what happened to John Hugh and his wife, Donna, when they were traveling south from Maine on vacation. “We took a drive down to Georgia and made our way back up and fell in love with Corolla,” he remembers.

 

In Maine, John worked as a fisherman, scallop diver and lobsterman, along with owning a lobster wharf. There, he also opened his own restaurant, bringing the offerings of the sea to diner’s tables.

It wasn’t until that trip to scenic and serene Corolla that John considered opening an additional restaurant. When a building in the Monterey Shopping Center was available to purchase, he made his move and opened Sun Fish Grill in 2009.

 

 

Brew Thru

Brew Thru

No trip to the Outer Banks is complete without cruising through Brew Thru, the Outer Banks’ original drive thru convenience store. Whether you’re looking for a refreshing cold beverage of Coke, Pepsi and other soft drinks on the go, stocking up your cooler with refreshments to enjoy at the beach or piling up on beer and wine for a party, Brew Thru is a fun and unique experience all vacationers need to see for themselves.

Drive-Through Beer & Gear

Brew Thru is Your One-Stop Shop at the Beach

The year was 1977, and Dana and Becky Lawrentz were chatting with friends over brews in their hometown of Akron, Ohio. They got to talking about a gas station convenience store in the area that had built a makeshift drive-through. Everyone agreed it would be pretty great if you could actually drive through a convenience store and pick up everything you needed without getting out of the car. But what would you call a place like that?

Well, you’d call it a Brew Thru.

It was an idea they couldn’t shake, so the Lawrentzes moved to the Outer Banks and built the first Brew Thru with the help of a partner. The idea was that people could come buy everything they would need for their trip to the beach—beer, wine, soft drinks, snacks, ice—without getting out of the car. That same year, a t-shirt salesman visiting the store and talked them into adding t-shirts to their product line—and 44 years later there are now more than five million Brew Thru t-shirts out in the wild.

The Lawrentzes’ daughter Brandy and her husband Philip Foreman purchased the business from them in 2002, and they now operate five locations across the Outer Banks.“We love being the one-stop shop for folks on the way to their beach house,” Foreman says. “Our car tenders are the friendliest people at the beach. We’re here to greet you, get you everything you need for your trip, load it up in the trunk for you, and have you leaving with a smile on your face.”

The store is quite expansive, featuring more than 100 brands of beer, dozens of wines and even a vast selection of cigars—not to mention all the snacks, t-shirts and other gear. To make ordering a little easier, customers in line get a menu—fondly known as the Summer-y—that outlines everything available at the store. These Summer-ies are also available in many of the beach rentals, which allows vacationers to decide what they want before driving through.

For customers who would like to get out and stretch their legs, there’s the Brew Thru Shop in Kill Devil Hills, where you can find their world famous t-shirts and other gifts. New t-shirt designs are created each year, making a yearly Brew Thru t-shirt a favorite of locals and annual visitors to the Outer Banks.

The Foremans both grew up in the Outer Banks, and they love that Brandy’s parents’ vision for a friendly and convenient place for people to grab their brews and other beach stay essentials is continuing to flourish.

“Our family has been welcoming people to the Outer Banks since 1977,” Foreman says. “We love this beautiful place, and we want everybody to get to enjoy it.”

(More Locations)
Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station
Bob's Wild Horse Adventure Tours
Lost Treasure Golf