4x4 Driving Guide:

One of the reasons so many vacationers flock to the Outer Banks is the thrill of driving on the beach, a rare privilege that few East Coast beach vacation destinations can offer. On the Outer Banks, beach driving enthusiasts will find miles of shoreline to explore, from the uninhabited shoreline along Ocracoke Island to the solely 4WD accessible beaches of Carova, north of Corolla.

A Jeep stops for the wild horses in Carova

In fact, driving on the beach isn't just a favorite local pastime and a draw to adventurous vacationers and fishermen. On the Outer Banks, it's practically an institution.

General Beach Driving Rules

  • 4x4 access and beaches often refer to the acronym "ORV", which stands for "Off Road Vehicle".
  • Unless otherwise marked, speed limits are 25mph and 15mph or slower near others/pets/wild animals. Speed limit on Hatteras & Ocracoke Islands (Cape Hatteras National Seashore) is 15mph.
  • Watch for fishing lines and children playing.
  • Stay at least 50 feet away from wild horses.
  • Never drive on dunes or vegetation.
  • Obey all posted signs.
  • Park perpendicular to the water in the middle of the beach.
  • Traffic flows near the shoreline and dunes, with parked cars sitting between.
  • Tow straps, shovel, spare tire, jack and jack board are recommended, and sometimes required to be in the vehicle.
  • Open containers of alcohol are prohibited in vehicles
  • Drivers need to have a current, valid driver's license
  • Avoid driving or parking on the wrack line. The wrack line is a line of accumulated natural debris left by a previous high tide. Wrack lines are an important food source for birds.
  • Pedestrians always have right-of-way on the beach

Easy access to your fishing gear from a 4x4 beach in Cape Hatteras National Seashore

Recommended Equipment

We've put together a short list of recommended items to get unstuck and stay safe. We like these linked products, but we took care to make sure they are highly-rated by many customers. Some of the product links include affiliate codes. *If a purchase is made, OuterBanks.com is paid a commission for the referral.

  • Traction Mats - These make it easy to drive out of ruts when you've dug into the sand.
  • High CFM Air Compressor - Save time and air up quickly.
  • Tow Strap - Just in case. Allows anyone to tow you out of a tough spot. Or, help a 4x4 friend.
  • Folding Shovel - Compact and capable of digging you out quickly.
  • Tire Pressure Gauge - You'll need this in combination with your compressor. 
  • First Aid Kit - The further you are from roads, the more important this becomes.
  • Fire Extinguisher - Another emergency essential in 4x4 terrain when emergency responders are miles away.

Where to drive on the Outer Banks beaches

Town Information

  • Corolla - 4x4 vehicles can access the beach at the Northern end of NC 12 where the paved road ends. 4x4 access North of this point is permitted year round. 4x4 access South of this point is permitted between October 1 and April 30. Driving at night is allowed. Overnight parking is allowed if the occupant is actively fishing. ATV's allowed for residents with permit.
  • Duck - No public 4x4 access. Private access allows vehicles vehicles on the beach between October 1 - April 30.
  • Southern Shores - Driving on the beach is prohibited.
  • Kitty Hawk - Driving on the beach is prohibited.
  • Kill Devil Hills - Driving on the beach is permitted with permit between October 1 - April 30 through designated access points. Vehicles must have current safety inspection, registration, insurance and license plate. Obtain a beach driving permit either from the Town of Kill Devil Hills or the Town of Nags Head. Through a reciprocal program, each town recognizes the beach driving permit issued by the other.
  • Nags Head - Driving on the beach is permitted with permit between October 1 - April 30 through designated access points. Vehicles must have current safety inspection, registration, insurance and license plate. Obtain a beach driving permit either from the Town of Kill Devil Hills or the Town of Nags Head. Through a reciprocal program, each town recognizes the beach driving permit issued by the other.
  • Rodanthe, Waves, Salvo, Avon, Buxton, Frisco, Hatteras, and Ocracoke - The beaches of Hatteras Island and Ocracoke Island are managed by the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Permits are required, and can be purchased online and sent via mail, or in person at one of the following locations: Coquina Beach office, Cape Hatteras Light Station, and the Ocracoke Visitor Center. Each vehicle must have its own permit. Vehicles must be registered, licensed, insured, and have a current safety inspection if required in home state/country. Vehicles must have low-pressure tire gauge, shovel, jack and jack support board. A spare tire, first-aid kit, fire extinguisher, trash bags, flashlight and tow straps are recommended. ATV's are not permitted. Night driving is generally allowed from November 16 through April 30. See current access ramps and beach closings by visiting this page and clicking on the "daily beach access map". Obey all posted signs.

Carova - One of the most notable locations to drive on the beach on the Outer Banks is the small village of Carova, and the neighboring beach communities of Seagull, Penny's Hill, Swan Beach, and North Swan Beach. (Although visitors will find that generally the majority of locals simply refer to the entire area as "Carova.")

To access the 4WD beaches of the Carova coastline, visitors simply take the sand ramp located at the very northern end of Corolla. From there, they can enjoy miles of beach driving, scenic ocean views, and if they're lucky, a glimpse of the wild horses, the area's first and most treasured local residents.

Day on the beach in Buxton (Cape Hatteras National Seashore)

Nags Head, Kills Devil Hills and Kitty Hawk - The central Outer Banks beaches of Nags Head, Kills Devil Hills and Kitty Hawk generally also allow beach driving, during certain conditions. Beach driving in these popular areas is restricted to the off-season winter months, for the safety of beach-goers, and a town driving permit may be required depending on the location. Virtually hidden ramps are located along the beach road, next to public access, and winter vacationers will find they have miles of open shoreline to explore. Even if you're exploring the central Outer Banks beaches on foot, the wintertime is an exceptionally attractive time to go, as the area is not quite a ghost town, with plenty of restaurants and shops still open, but the beaches offer ample elbow room for fishing, shelling, or just enjoying a long secluded stroll.

Hatteras Island and Ocracoke - The Cape Hatteras National Seashore which comprises the beaches of Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands also offers miles of shoreline for beach drivers to explore, all marked by brown, National Park Service managed "ramp markers" that indicate the mile and entrance point of every beach ramp along these islands.

These beach access ramps begin with Coquina Beach, located just a few miles north of Nags Head, and extend all the way to the Ocracoke Inlet ramp, which literally borders the town of Ocracoke's city limits.

In between, vacationers will find a dozen seasonally open beach access ramps, including 4 in between the tri-villages of Rodanthe, Waves and Salvo and the town of Avon, one in between Avon and Buxton, one in the heart of Frisco, and one on the very southern edge of Hatteras Village that leads out to Hatteras Inlet.

On Ocracoke Island, visitors will find a handful of beach access ramps that begin just 100 yards or so from the ferry docks, and are located throughout the island all the way to the Ocracoke Inlet ramp. Because of Ocracoke's unique geographic location, the time it takes to get from the edge of the entrance of the beach access ramp to the oceanfront itself can vary greatly. For example, near the ferry docks, it's just a quick drive across the dunes to access the beach, but on the ramp closest to the village, drivers can expect to travel a long sandy road, (easily travelling a good mile), before arriving to the oceanfront.

All of the beach driving areas and ramps on Hatteras and Ocracoke Island are open seasonally, meaning that during certain times of year, (specifically in the summer months), some areas may be closed for threatened species that are breeding, or sea turtles that are nesting. The National Park Service has a weekly updated map on their website, which outlines the areas of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore that are open to pedestrians, vehicles, or both, and summer visitors are encouraged to check out their website to confirm which beach driving areas are open during their vacation.

Ramps are marked in Cape Hatteras National Seashore on Hatteras Island. Permit required.

4x4 Access Permits for Cape Hatteras National Seashore

Beach drivers on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore will need to obtain a Beach Driving Permit before hitting the shore, and can be purchased online and sent via mail, or in person at one of the following locations: Coquina Beach office, Cape Hatteras Light Station, and the Ocracoke Visitor Center. Each vehicle must have its own permit. Vehicles must be registered, licensed, insured, and have a current safety inspection if required in home state/country. Vehicles must have low-pressure tire gauge, shovel, jack and jack support board. A spare tire, first-aid kit, fire extinguisher, trash bags, flashlight and tow straps are recommended. ATV's are not permitted. Night driving is generally allowed from November 16 through April 30. See current access ramps and beach closings by visiting this page and clicking on the "daily beach access map". Obey all posted signs. To acquire a permit, a prospective beach driver must watch a 10 minute video regarding beach driving rules and regulations, and pay a weekly or annual fee, depending on the beach driver's preference.

Once a beach driving permit is secured, drivers are encouraged to pay close attention to the NPS rules and regulations which are posted at the entrance point of every beach ramp on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The rules are easy to follow, and include such guidelines such as maintaining (or not exceeding) a certain speed, keeping pets on a leash, tire pressure recommendations, or other general NPS rules.

The reward for jumping through the local hoops is access to some of the islands' best beaches, which are sparsely travelled and offer unparalleled shelling, fishing, and gorgeous oceanfront, sound, or inlet views.

Tips for Driving on an Outer Banks Beach

  • 4x4 is the Gold Standard - The first and foremost rule to beach driving is to use a 4WD vehicle. While some AWD or even front-wheel drive vehicles may be able to navigate through certain areas, specifically along the soundside or any beach that has hard, packed sand, the majority of the Outer Banks is comprised of deep and soft sand, which can only be navigated with a 4WD vehicle, particularly when it comes to making turns, or having to veer off the established tracks.
  • Air down - Before hitting the shores, you'll also want to be sure and air down your tires. Slack tires are essential to navigating through the sand, and visitors are encouraged to decrease their tire air pressure to 15 - 22 PSI, depending on the beach conditions. (In other words, a lower PSI works much better in softer sand, while a higher PSI might be fine in harder, packed sand conditions.)
  • Air up upon returning to pavement - No need to worry about having slack tires for the rest of your vacation. The majority of local convenience stores and gas stations, particularly those closest to the beach access ramps, offer free air hoses so you can fill your tires back up before you travel too far along the pavement.
  • Staying in tracks - Once on the beach, it is best, if possible, to stick to the established sand tracks that run along the high tide line. These tracks are formed by dozens of daily drivers that have consequently created a hard packed route, making driving along the beach an easier venture. Drivers will notice there are generally two sets of tracks, or "two lanes," along the shoreline, and are encouraged to follow the same rules as a regular road - stick to the farthest right tracks, don't pass unless necessary, and don't veer off the "beach" road.
  • Wash down - Above all else, whenever possible, make sure you drive above the high tide line. Driving along the ocean wash will only splash saltwater into the undercarriage of your vehicle, (which can completely ruin a truck). We recommend spraying your undercarriage A.S.A.P. when your beach drive is over. Also, in the unfortunate case you get stuck, if you're located above the high tide line, you don't have to worry about the imminent threat of saltwater.
  • Be Neighborly - The best rule of thumb for beach drivers is to be considerate. Don't air down your tires on the middle of a beach ramp, observe local speed limit regulations, and be mindful of the families and pets around you. The rules of the paved road also apply to the rules of the beach road, and beach drivers should follow this rule of thumb accordingly.
  • Take some tools - We recommend carrying a small shovel, traction mats (floor mats work in a pinch), a jack (and jack board to put underneath), and tow rope. it just makes good sense to be prepared with basics.

If you get stuck

We've put together a short list of recommended items to get unstuck and stay safe

Even the most seasoned local beach driver can get stuck on the sand from time to time, and with a few extra precautions and measures ahead of time, getting stuck on the beach can easily turn into a funny vacation story, instead of a frustrating vacation headache.

Before you hit the sand, make sure you have a shovel, two 2' x 4's (about 4-6' ft. in length), and a tow rope, which can be purchased at virtually any hardware store.

While driving along the beach, if you feel yourself getting stuck in the sand, the most important thing is to not try to force your way out. Spinning your tires will only drag you deeper down into the soft sandy ruts.

Instead, hop out of the vehicle, and start digging behind or in front of your tires, depending on where your tires are lodged the deepest, and where the easiest route off the patch of sand is. Once an uphill path is created, you can try to move the vehicle again, or you can lay down the 2' x 4's, giving your vehicle some stable ground to drive on.

Still stuck? Many new beach drivers are surprised and delighted to find how many of their beach driving neighbors are willing to help. Chances are, if there is a vehicle passing by or parked up the beach, they will probably pause and assist you in getting out of the sand. This is where the town rope comes in handy. Just be sure that the vehicle that is pulling you out is an equal size and weight or more, or else you very well might both get stuck in the process.

As a last resort, the Outer Banks is also home to a number of towing companies that are stationed throughout the beaches, and are particularly concentrated around areas that are popular with beach driving, (specifically, Carova and Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands.) Always on call, a local towing company can assist you year-round, and can have your vehicle out of the sand in no time.

Yes, getting stuck is always a risk when it comes to beach driving, but sandy drivers on the Outer Banks find the risk is most certainly worth the reward. As one of the few coastal destinations where vacationers can jump in their truck and head to the ocean, beach driving is a decades-old way of life that has been maintained and celebrated on the Outer Banks, and is as old as tourism on the OBX itself.

By taking a drive along the beach, vacationers will find they can easily pack all the gear they desire, discover new and inviting locations, and basically tour huge parcels of the Outer Banks shoreline without even stepping out of their vehicle.

For a different perspective on the standard beach day, load up the truck, the family, and even the pets, and drive out onto the sand for a fantastic, uniquely Outer Banks adventure. Chances are that after a leisurely spin along the shoreline, like generations of vacationers, you'll be simply hooked.

4x4 Beach Access Ramp at the North end of NC 12 in Corolla

4x4 Beach Driving History

For decades, the only way for vacationers to even access the majority of the Outer Banks beaches was by hitting the sand, making a visit to the OBX a rustic and downright tricky adventure.

Before NC Highway 12 was built all the way to Corolla in the late 60s and early 70s, visitors had to follow sandy paths, from either the north along the Virginia state line, or from the south via the more developed beaches of Nags Head, Kill Devil Hills and Kitty Hawk. The 20 mile or so trip was a tricky one, with unpredictable high tides and mud flats that could easily slow a driver down.

After Corolla and Duck were developed, homes slowly started springing up along the Outer Banks northernmost beaches, under the assumption that NC Highway 12 would eventually follow its northern path all the way to the Virginia state border.

But due to a number of property ownership factors and environmental concerns, that never happened, and instead, a well-worn sand "road" was haphazardly created, allowing trucks of all sizes to access the small northern villages.

Today, this area is home to a varying collection of vacation rental homes, ranging from shaded 3 bedroom soundside cottages to behemoth oceanfront rental homes. Though the landscape and variety of accommodations may have changed, one factor remains the same - the only way to get to this area is via a 4WD vehicle and a ride along the Outer Banks shoreline.

Frequent Carova vacationers love this attribute, as it means that the area remains sparsely populated, with no commercial businesses or large complexes to intrude on the natural landscape. In fact, because of its limited population, the area is also the centuries-old home of the Carova Wild Horses, who roam the beaches freely without any worry of encountering highway traffic.

Conditions were similar on Hatteras Island, which until the construction of the Herbert C. Bonner Bridge in the early 1960s, was only accessible by a privately run ferry owned and operated by Captain Tillet.

Once successfully ferried across the Oregon Inlet to the island, drivers could either follow the oceanfront beaches to the main villages, (with sand that was as deep and soft as it is today), or attempt to follow a series of sporadically used small trails that veered from the ocean dunes to the soundside. Taking either path was a tricky endeavor, and adventurous vacationers could expect the trip from Nags Head to the main villages of Hatteras Island to take several hours in the very best of conditions.

Thankfully, after decades of development and subsequent paved roads and bridges, the hike to get to some of the Outer Banks' most treasured and quiet vacation destinations is by all means no longer an ordeal. But the love of driving on the beach has never quite disappeared from these beaches, both among locals who have been driving along the beaches their entire life, and newcomers who love the convenience of driving until they find that perfect, secluded beach spot.

Ready to take the 4WD vehicle out for a spin? Beach driving is a time-tested and fun activity on the Outer Banks that's open to everyone, locals and visitors alike, and many folks find after that first initial trip, they are officially dedicated to exploring beach spots well off the beaten path.

Just for the Beach Rentals

Just for the Beach Rentals

Just for the Beach Rentals (not to be confused with the similarly-named "Just for the Beach") offers rentals to accommodate your stay. Equipment includes linens, baby gates, cribs, monitors, seats, joggers, bikes, kayaks, skim boards, surf boards, and SUP. Free delivery is available with a modest rental order, from Corolla to Nags Head (not including 4x4 areas). Just for the Beach offers two convenient locations in Corolla and Kill Devil Hills.

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Hang Gliding

Hang Gliding

Flight takes many forms on the Outer Banks, from the thousands of migratory birds that travel along these barrier islands to and from their winter destinations, to aviation pioneers like the Wright Brothers who launched the world's first airplane off the sand dunes of Kill Devil Hills. Visitors can also experience the Outer Banks' inherent love of all things aerial by taking flight themselves with a day of Hang Gliding.

Outer Banks Brewing Station

Outer Banks Brewing Station

The Outer Banks Brewing Station, established in 2001, is the first wind powered brewpub in the U.S. and an icon on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Look for the 92 foot wind turbine in the backyard beer garden. A pub by the classic European style of a ‘public house’, the Brewing Station considers itself an important member of the community and is family friendly during lunch and dinner hours. Families can enjoy live music, beer and food inside and out, while the little ones play on the pirate ship and the older ones play a friendly game of corn hole. It’s also a great place to wait for your table during the busy summer season.

Outer Banks Museums

Outer Banks Museums

The Outer Banks is rich in history, from the early explorers who first set foot on its shores 400 years ago to the groundbreaking first flight that launched modern aviation. Every community has a story and a resonant heritage, and as a result, the Outer Banks is home to a number of locally and nationally renowned museums honoring the area's unique stories, culture and landmarks.

TRiO

TRiO

Wine, beer and cheese lovers will love TRiO, an exciting retail and tasting destination in Kitty Hawk. Both a gourmet retail wine, beer and cheese shop as well as a bistro with a wine bar and tap house, TRiO offers the best of the worlds of wine, beer and cheese for your enjoyment on premise or in the comfort of your home. TRiO's bistro is elegant and comfortable, with a large bar and two-story dining and bar area. The gourmet bistro menu of appetizers, and light fare such as cheese and charcuterie, paninis and salads make TRiO a wonderful lunch and dinner restaurant. Unique and high-tech self service WineStations are available in the downstairs bar area, where you can sample full, half and tastes of wines of all regions at varying price ranges. If you prefer beer, you can select from 24 beers on tap or try a TRiO Flight and sample a taste of four beers. In the upstairs mezzanine, which is part of the bistro, you'll find comfortable lounge seating and a free pool table. TRiO also has live music from local and visiting artist 4-5 nights a week all year long.

Outer Banks Ferry System

Outer Banks Ferry System

Decades ago, one of the only ways to access some of the most secluded areas of the Outer Banks was via a ferry, and this tradition carries on today for thousands if not millions of visitors who want to travel to some of coastal North Carolina's most famous and off-the-map locales.

Super Wings

Super Wings

Best Store on the beach! Everything you need for your vacation. The newest ladies' and girls swimsuits, 20% off every day! Largest selection of beach supplies and the best deals on T-shirts, sweatshirts and mens, ladies, and kids, apparel, swimwear and resort wear. Get all your souvenirs, suntan lotions, beach towels, floats, kites, and more. The only 1 stop shop on the beach.

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Event Homes

Event Homes

In the past few years, the Outer Banks has become a popular destination for large families and groups who are planning a beach wedding, a corporate retreat, or just a casual family reunion. This turn of recent events is due in no small part to the crop of sprawling vacation rental homes that have popped up throughout the coastline providing gorgeous accommodations, ample meeting or gathering spaces, and fantastic access to the nearby beaches and attractions.

Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum

Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum

More than 2,000 shipwrecks sunk off the Coast of North Carolina in what’s called the Graveyard of the Atlantic. With all that history floating around, it was only natural to build a museum to honor and preserve the maritime culture of the Outer Banks. A state-of-the-art structure, the year round museum houses and displays artifacts, and presents a variety of exhibits and interprets the rich maritime culture that includes war, piracy, ghost ships and more. Artifacts include thoseex from the USS Monitor, which sank 16 miles off the Hatteras coast. The lobby features the stunning and original, 1854, First Order Lens from the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. Current hibits include those on piracy and the Civil War on Hatteras Island.

Outer Beaches Realty

Outer Beaches Realty

Spend less time planning and more time vacationing when you stay with Outer Beaches Realty. With nearly 450 homes and all your wish-list amenities, we have options to fit every style and budget. Guests love our all-inclusive pricing with NO booking fees, LayAway Vacations, E-Z Pay options and more, so much so they’ve rated us higher than all other vacation rental companies on the Island on Yelp, Google, and Facebook! And with some of the friendliest staff around, a stay with Outer Beaches means you’ll become part of our family before you even arrive. Book your reservation with us and let the fun begin today.

Outer Banks Real Estate

Outer Banks Real Estate

After a few days of sunny beach afternoons, fantastic local attractions, and all the amenities that attract people to the Outer Banks, many visitors find themselves daydreaming about a more permanent vacation. Whether your ultimate goal is to own an investment property, a retirement or vacation home, or simply a year-round home on the beach, the Outer Banks is filled with incredible opportunities and a variety of properties for sale.

The Lost Colony

The Lost Colony

In July of 1587, 117 English men, women, and children came ashore on Roanoke Island with a commission from Elizabeth I to establish a permanent English settlement in the New World. Just three years later in 1590, when English ships returned to bring supplies to the settlement, they found the island deserted with no sign of the colonists except the single word, “CROATOAN,” carved into the surface of an abandoned structure and the letters, “CRO,” scratched into the bark of a tree. After nearly 450 years, the mystery of what happened to the colonists remains unsolved.

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