EARLY BIRD SPECIAL

Enjoy what Captain Stuart Wescott calls a guaranteed dolphin watch tour June through October. Not only scenic, the tour on the Captain Johnny is incredibly educational. Learn about the bottlenose dolphins that frequent our waters.  See them mate and birth on many cruises, and enjoy their playful behavior. 

Breathtaking views abound. There is plenty of elbowroom aboard Captain Johnny so no one misses seeing these creatures in the wild. The boat is covered for sun protection with a restroom on board. It also is Coast Guard inspected. Learned, local crews are available to answer questions about the Outer Banks. This is the kind of trip that enlivens and refreshes guests as they cruise across the water with wind in their faces!

Want to see a glorious Outer Banks sunset, too? Then choose their sunset dolphin watch. The tour departs about two hours before sunset, which varies week to week. You will be given a departure schedule when you reserve tickets. Tickets are only sold the week of the tour. Reservations are preferred, for the tour sells out early. It runs Monday thru Friday weather permitting unless a private tour has been scheduled.

So what do we mean by guaranteed? If no dolphins are found, paying passengers may ride again free during the current season (with some restrictions).  Office hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Trips are scheduled at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and sunset cruise is 6:15 p.m. Call us at 252-473-1475 for tickets!

Manteo
Hours
  • Monday8:00am-6:00pm
  • Tuesday8:00am-6:00pm
  • Wednesday8:00am-6:00pm
  • Thursday8:00am-6:00pm
  • Friday8:00am-6:00pm
Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education

Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education

Corolla, North Carolina is a must see nautical village scented with the spray of the salty sea. It's located on NC Highway 12 along a thin strip of land bordered on the east by the tempestuous Atlantic Ocean, and on the west by the inland waterway of Currituck Sound. Corolla is home to the Currituck Beach Lighthouse, whose beacon first beckoned to sailors at sea in 1875, and to art noveau Whalehead in Historic Corolla, a turn of the century hunt club for sportsmen. The quaint village is also home to one of North Carolina's natural history gems called the Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education. The center, which opened in 2006, is an impressive and marvelous 22,000 square foot interpretive center for young and old alike to explore the history and vast diversity of North Carolina's wildlife.